Impact Investing: Return on Investment From Marketing Social Goods

Impact Investing Return on Investment From Marketing Social Goods

Can you do well while doing good? This is the ultimate question for a marketer in the public and social sector. Doing well in the public and social sector means more than just money. Earning money leads to sustainability and scale, two qualities that communities desperately need and funders desperately seek.

Continue reading Impact Investing: Return on Investment From Marketing Social Goods

Design Thinking: Asking the Right Questions to Address the Five Villains of the Social Good

Design Thinking Questions Address Villains Social Good

The American Marketing Association definition of marketing centers on the concept of offerings: “Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.” A prime design question for this blog then becomes what should public and social sector organizations offer that has value for both clients and society at large?

Continue reading Design Thinking: Asking the Right Questions to Address the Five Villains of the Social Good

Business solution to poverty: Hello Tractor

Hello Tractor

The book The Business Solution to Poverty argues against non-profit development and for scalable, business-like approaches to end poverty. When I reviewed the book, I saw a lot of practical wisdom in the argument, but also wondered how many such approaches could live up to the challenge. I think Hello Tractor could make the grade.

Continue reading Business solution to poverty: Hello Tractor

Distribution as a product to combat poverty: JITA

Bangladeshi woman

Distribution is most often considered something that a business does with its product. But distribution itself can be the product, as well. In remote, impoverished areas, distribution can also be a solution to poverty, illness, and other problems.

Continue reading Distribution as a product to combat poverty: JITA

The Business Solution to Poverty: design for scale

Business Solution to Poverty

I like how Paul Polak and Mal Warwick start The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion New Customers focused on their target customer, the global poor who live on less than $2 per day. This is a massive customer segment: 2.7 billion people.

Continue reading The Business Solution to Poverty: design for scale

The Business Solution to Poverty: marketing and design

Business Solution to Poverty

So far, my posts have been somewhat critical of  The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion New Customers, by Paul Polak and Mal Warwick, and I can think of at least a couple more critical points. However, I really appreciate their approach to marketing and design.

Continue reading The Business Solution to Poverty: marketing and design

The Business Solution to Poverty: the role of the citizen sector

Business Solution to Poverty

In The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion New Customers, authors Paul Polak and Mal Warwick believe that, unlike government and philanthropy, business is uniquely capable of solving poverty. Still, they allow room for others to pitch in.

Continue reading The Business Solution to Poverty: the role of the citizen sector

The Business Solution to Poverty: is business special?

Business Solution to Poverty

Readers of this blog don’t need to guess why this book title attracted my attention: The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion New Customers, by Paul Polak and Mal Warwick. At this writing, I’ve read through part one of three.

The world economy has expanded 17-fold since 1950, yet more than one-third of the planet lives extreme poverty. Polak and Warwick estimate that 2.7 billion people in the world live on $2 a day or less. Most of these people reside in India, Africa, and Asia, including China; they define this population as “The Global South.” You can sense the authors’ feelings of unfairness at this situation. I agree.

Continue reading The Business Solution to Poverty: is business special?