Organizational narrative: criminals and sleuths

Crime Scene

One popular post on this blog covers the villains, victims and heroes in organizational storytelling. This triad of characters has driven stories for thousands of years. Starting in the 1800s with authors such as Edgar Allen Poe and Wilkie Collins, writers focused on the theme of crime using a specialized triad of characters: criminal, victim, and sleuth. You can use these roles in your organizational storytelling.

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Organizational narrative: Five villains of the social good

organizational-narrative-five-villains-social-good
A Christmas Carol: Ignorance and Want, by John Leech

Looking for a villain for the organizational storytelling of your public- or social-sector organization? Look no further than the gang of Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness.

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Marketing the Social Good: Top Five Posts of 2015

Top Five

To continue bringing you topics of interest in the new year, I took a look back at what you read the most this year. Here are the top five posts published in 2015, as measured by your views:

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Organizational narrative: Lead with your big idea

Sinek

Recently, as part of my day job, I organized a track of speakers for our company conference in New Orleans. It went about as well as a day of eight PowerPoint presentations in a hotel ballroom could go. But after the lunch break we lost a few people to lure of the sunny fall day outside, not to mention the city’s unique sights and sounds and tastes. At the end of the conference I wondered what more I could do to make next year’s event something more, something better?

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Organizational narrative: Stories make humans uniquely social


Historian Yuval Noah Harari has an interesting theory about what makes us humans different from other animals and the species that is most advanced and adaptable.

After all, we’re not that much different from chimpanzees or Capuchin monkeys. If you put a human and a chimp in a Man Vs. Wild scenario, undoubtedly the chimp would win. Individually, we humans are not that impressive when compared to other animals.

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Free tools! A style guide for your organization

free tools organizational style guide

How do Doctors Without Borders and the World Wildlife Fund and Oxfam and Amnesty International maintain consistently distinctive and professional identities across the world? I’m sure part of their secret is using an organizational style guide.

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Organizational narrative: critiquing Elon Musk’s pitch for Tesla Energy

A recent article in Medium gives an informative critique of Elon Musk‘s pitch for Tesla Energy earlier this year, including five elements to include in any pitch. Two of those five elements line up with the hero’s quest and Pixar pitch that I’ve previously discussed.

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Organizational Narrative: More acts, more action!

organizational-narrative-more-acts-more-action

Was your middle school English teacher actually on to something with those five awful-sounding parts of a story? Exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, denouement.

I still struggle with that last one–it sounds abstract yet somehow dirty. But there’s evidence that including all five of these acts in your story, no matter how short, can make you a more effective storyteller.

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Free dowload! Organizational narrative toolkit from Solutions Journalism Network

Organizational narrative toolkit

I follow Solutions Journalism Network in social media and have featured their stories on this blog (such as here). They’re a group of national-caliber, Putlizer-winning journalists and support staff who comprise an “independent, non-profit organization working to legitimize and spread the practice of solutions journalism: rigorous and compelling reporting about┬áresponses to social problems.” They’ve now published a free organizational narrative toolkit that you can apply to your organizational narrative.

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